Requiem Mass honoring American and French dead, Casablanca, 23 November 1942

Having just finished General Omar Bradley’s “A Soldier’s Story”, I am now reading General George S. Patton’s “War As I Knew It”. Both books are original somewhat musty editions, found by my dear wife in a used book store.

General Patton kept a detailed diary from July, 1942 until 5 December 1945, 5 days before his fatal car crash. At the conclusion of the conflict he himself wrote the short book “War As I Knew It”, based on personal recollection and heavy extracts from his diary. Due to his untimely death his wife, Beatrice Ayer Patton, edited the book, along with annotation and footnoting by Patton’s Chief of Staff throughout the war, Col. Paul Harkin. The book was published in 1947. Like General Bradley (and, for that matter, other Generals such as Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant), Patton was an excellent, erudite and engaging author, and his work is a pleasure to read.

I thought I would share with you some snippets which caught my eye; both are from the North African campaign in late 1942, and take place in Morocco. Keep in mind that the French forces in Morocco initially opposed the American landings; there was brief but intense land and naval combat prior to the French agreeing to an armistice. Gen. Patton was quite proficient in the French language.

Nov 2, 1942 (aboard USS Augusta, prior to the Morocco landings)

This is the best mess (“mess”=chow hall for you USMC types, galley for you Navy types, TC) I have ever seen. I fear I shall get fat… Just finished reading the Koran – a good book, and interesting…

Nov 24, 1942

REQUIEM MASS, HONORING FRENCH AND AMERICAN DEAD, HELD AT CASABLANCA, November 23, 1942

General Keyes, Admiral Hall, and I met General Nogues and Admiral Michelier, and … proceeded with a police escort to the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart. The streets were lined with French and American soldiers … the Cathedral was crowded to the doors.

The Bishop of Morocco, in full red robes and wearing a four-sided red cap, met us at the door and conducted us to the front of the Cathedral. Here there were two biers: the American on the right, covered with an American flag, and with a guard of six American soldiers, and the French on the left, with a French flag and a similar guard.

At the termination of the Mass we followed the clergy out … A rather incongruous feature to me was the fact that in front of the people, when we entered and when we left, was a guard of Mohammedan cavalry on foot, Armed with sabres.”

I just thought it was an interesting vignette. The Novus ordo invention was some 25 years in the future. The Cathedral building (built 1930) still exists, but is now a museum.

Valete.

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Thought you might be interested...

From the TownHall Tipsheet:

Maine's moderate Republican Senator Susan Collins told CNN's Jake Tapper today that she would not be supporting a Supreme Court nominee who has "demonstrated hostility to Roe v. Wade" because, in her mind, that would be a justice who does not respect established precedent. (Scott v. Sanford (1857) was also established precedent. Should we not respect it as well? – TC)

I mention this not because I am in any way surprised by Sen. Collins’ position, for I am not. After all, Senator Collins (no relation) has used her tremendous wealth and power to further both abortion (where she recently voted to support post 20 week abortions) as well as so-called same-sex marriage, among many other “progressive” agenda items which increasingly conflict with Catholic moral teaching. I mention this because Senator Collins is publicly identified as Catholic in several places, including here and here.

Senator Collins’ website makes no mention of faith of any sort. Therefore, various links which name her as Catholic notwithstanding, I have no idea whether Sen. Collins is or ever was Catholic, or if she in any way publicly practices the faith. If, however, she does currently practice the Catholic faith, then many of her political positions (including her current statements on Supreme Court nominees) would seem, to my uneducated poor layman’s brain, to constitute florid scandal of the sort that Nancy Pelosi, Joe Biden and other high profile self-proclaimed Catholics routinely engage in.

Scandal is an attitude or behavior which leads another to do evil. The person who gives scandal becomes his neighbor’s tempter. He damages virtue and integrity; he may even draw his brother into spiritual death. Scandal is a grave offense if by deed or omission another is deliberately led into a grave offense.” Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), 2284

Qui cum canibus concumbunt cum pulicibus surgent.

Valete.

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11th Anniversary of Summorum pontificum tomorrow (First Saturday) 7 July 2018

Last year was the 10th Anniversary of Summorum Pontificum. Tomorrow, 7 July, 2018 (First Saturday) would, therefore, be the 11th anniversary. Impressed with my perspicacity? Perhaps not. Anyways, from National Catholic Register a year ago:

Once Sacred, Always Sacred

On July 7, 2007, Pope Benedict XVI decreed that the traditional liturgy of the Roman rite was to be officially available to all the Church’s faithful alongside the new liturgy of Blessed Pope Paul VI.

Pope St. John Paul II had allowed the traditional Latin Mass to be celebrated with limitations, but with his motu proprio (papal edict) Summorum Pontificum, Benedict removed the remaining restrictions. He stressed the old rite had never been abrogated but was henceforth to be known as the “extraordinary form” of the Roman Rite, and the new Mass introduced by Paul VI would be known as the "ordinary form.”...

At the time, Cardinal Robert Sarah gave an address to the colloquium "The Source of the Future," held on March 29 to April 1, 2017 at Herzogenrath, near Aachen (Germany). Catholic World Report published the entire text of his comments, a couple of samples follow (emphases are mine):

...In his Letter to the Bishops that accompanied the Motu proprio, Pope Benedict XVI clearly explained that the purpose for his decision to have the two missals coexist was ... to allow for the mutual enrichment of the two forms of the same Roman rite ... not only their peaceful coexistence but also the possibility of perfecting them by emphasizing the best features that characterize them. He wrote in particular that “the two Forms of the usage of the Roman rite can be mutually enriching: new Saints and some of the new Prefaces can and should be inserted in the old Missal….  The celebration of the Mass according to the Missal of Paul VI (the "1962 Missal"– TC) will be able to demonstrate, more powerfully than has been the case hitherto, the sacrality which attracts many people to the former usage.” ... In parishes where it has been possible to implement the Motu proprio, pastors testify to the greater fervor both in the faithful and in the priests...

Now it is enough to pick up the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy again and to read it honestly, without betraying its meaning, to see that the true purpose of the Second Vatican Council was not to start a reform that could become the occasion for a break with Tradition, but quite the contrary, to rediscover and to confirm Tradition in its deepest meaning. In fact, what is called “the reform of the reform”, which perhaps ought to be called more precisely “the mutual enrichment of the rites”, to use an expression from the Magisterium of Benedict XVI, is a primarily spiritual necessity. And it quite obviously concerns the two forms of the Roman rite. The particular care that should be brought to the liturgy, the urgency of holding it in high esteem and working for its beauty, its sacral character and keeping the right balance between fidelity to Tradition and legitimate development, and therefore rejecting absolutely and radically any hermeneutic of discontinuity or rupture: these essential elements are the heart of all authentic Christian liturgy. Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger tirelessly repeated that the crisis that has shaken the Church for fifty years, chiefly since Vatican Council II, is connected with the crisis of the liturgy, and therefore to the lack of respect, the desacralization and the leveling of the essential elements of divine worship. “I am convinced,” he writes, “that the crisis in the Church that we are experiencing today is to a large extent due to the disintegration of the liturgy.”...

The NCR article is short and easy, a nice, quick review. Cardinal Sarah's comments are long, and more challenging, but clear, unambiguous and certainly intelligible to anyone who takes the time to digest them.

Valete.

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The Hemits of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Pennsylvania

Recently I received a note from Br. Thomas Mary of Jesus, Prior of the Hermits of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in the Diocese of Harrisburg, PA. As requested, I am passing it on to you, dear reader:

"Blessings to you and all in Una Voce during this Octave of the Sacred Heart (Carmelite Rite)! 

With joy in God and Our Blessed Mother, I introduce to you a new traditional religious community in the Church: the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Bishop Ronald Gainer of the Diocese of Harrisburg canonically erected the community on February 22nd, and has given his full support to the community’s religious charism and spiritual mission in the Church today.

Following the primitive Rule of St. Albert, the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel lives a strict contemplative religious life for the glory of God, the honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the salvation of souls. Its charism and priestly apostolate are a revival of the ancient eremitical Carmelite observance, in imitation of the ancient desert Fathers and the first hermits who were consecrated to a religious life of prayer, penance, reparation, and intercession on Mount Carmel in the Holy Land. Returning to the spirit of the founders of the Carmelite Order and in love for the ancient liturgy of the Church, the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel preserve and exclusively offer the traditional Carmelite Rite in the Divine Office and the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass..."

 

As a new religious community, they are seeking both spiritual and material support. Details from the body of the letter are here:

Following the primitive Rule of St. Albert, the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel lives a strict contemplative religious life for the glory of God, the honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the salvation of souls. Its charism and priestly apostolate are a revival of the ancient eremitical Carmelite observance, in imitation of the ancient desert Fathers and the first hermits who were consecrated to a religious life of prayer, penance, reparation, and intercession on Mount Carmel in the Holy Land ... 

"...we labor to sow the seeds of divine grace, true Catholic doctrine, and authentic spiritual formation through three principal means:

 

  1. A specific apostolate of contemplative religious priests: Through confession, spiritual direction, preaching, and the celebration of the traditional liturgy, the priests of the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel perform a specific apostolate that is for the spiritual formation and enduring benefit of priests, religious, seminarians, and the lay faithful.
  2. Sacramental and spiritual support for traditional Carmelite Nuns: The Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel will be helping to ensure the provision of the traditional liturgy for the new monastery of the Discalced Carmelite Nuns of the Carmel of Jesus, Mary & Joseph in Fairfield, Pennsylvania and spiritually assisting their two sister monasteries in Elysburg and Philadelphia. These monasteries are some of the most vibrant communities of traditional women religious in the world and are achieving an impressive revival of the religious life instituted by St. Teresa of Avila and St. John of the Cross more than five centuries ago. They have so many vocations that they have established five new monasteries—all of traditional liturgical observance—in nine years, and they are preparing a sixth. 
  3. A retreat and guest house for the spiritual benefit of the faithful: In addition, once the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel receive the support needed to complete the initial material foundation, the community will have a guest retreat house available for priests, religious, and the lay faithful from the region and around the country. Through this retreat house, the community looks forward to offering a prayerful reprieve and a religious setting for those visiting the area or the beautiful chapel of the Discalced Carmelite Nuns in order to be refreshed and enkindled by the rich liturgical and spiritual life that resounds therein. Being in Fairfield, Pennsylvania, the location is within accessible driving range of several major city centers, including Harrisburg, Washington D.C., Baltimore, Pittsburg, Richmond, Philadelphia, New Jersey, and New York City. The retreat and guest house will facilitate the priestly apostolate of the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel by enabling them to make available the sacraments in their traditional form, spiritual direction and formation for guests and retreatants...

 

"... For the sake of a more focused religious observance, humble manual labor, and greater availability for the priests of our community to serve the spiritual needs of the faithful, the community does not operate any regular business, but subsists on alms and the charity of the faithful. Because of the simplicity of its religious observance (requiring only small, separate hermitages and structures, as opposed to a large monastery complex), and the spiritual and priestly character of its apostolate, its ongoing operational costs and overhead are notably low. The community is already capable of its normal material maintenance and will continue to be so in perpetuity. 

However, the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel... are obliged by our religious poverty to beg and to seek the vital support of some generous souls who ... can provide the substantial investments needed to accomplish the one-time work of materially establishing the permanent home for this religious foundation and its members, through the purchase of property, acquisition of materials for the community’s observance, and the construction of the basic and most essential facilities... Once the fundamental needs of the initial foundation are fulfilled, the happily growing community will be able to quietly and fruitfully live its spiritual mission without such a need to appeal for external support...

 "Therefore, on behalf of the community, we humbly request that you might share word about the traditional charism and particular material needs of our community with the members of your Una Voce Chapter or with other individuals who may be able and willing to help  the religious and priests of the Hermits of Our Lady of Mount Carmel to complete their foundation and live their vocation in the service of God and His Church. May God reward you for any help that may be offered and for kindly spreading the word!"

So, I am passing this along for your prayerful consideration.

Valete!

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Quo vadis: What is the future of the Church?

From Commonweal via Fr. Z:

There was never silence or stillness at Mass for me growing up…

“…Then, three or four years ago, on a whim, I attended Latin Mass at St. Mary’s Cathedral in Austin, Texas. Just a block from the State Capitol, St. Mary’s is modest, with bare wood pews and a sanctuary set back from the congregation. I paged through a blue book that had Latin text on one page and English text on the facing page, with stage directions and illustrations in the margins.

My faith is not certain, and my doubt leads to questions. The Latin Mass welcomes me into the silence that allows me to seek the answers.’

Despite Catholic school and all that CCD, I didn’t realize until then the Novus ordo wasn’t just a straight translation. The Latin readings confused me; I couldn't tell, for example, just when the transubstantiation was occurring. But I knew without looking at the translation when we were saying “Lamb of God” and the Lord’s Prayer. I watched these strange ways of doing familiar things. The priest faced away from us. We knelt to take communion on the tongue. All the altar servers were male. I bowed at the priest during the recessional, incense still in my nostrils. Then I did something I'd never done after Mass. I sat in a pew, and I felt it: peace…

“…I don’t think (the Latin Mass) is the future of the church, even though I’ve noticed the pews are filled with fellow Gen X-ers and their children. (My nine-year-old daughter has been to more Latin Masses than English.) The English Mass is too easy; the unfamiliarity of the Latin Mass requires me to quiet my mind, to focus, to attend to my faith in a way that Mass in English does not. It isn't a refuge from a changing world, but a base from which to engage it. My faith is not certain, and my doubt leads to questions. The Latin Mass welcomes me into the silence that allows me to seek the answers.” (my emphasis)

Fr. James V. Schall, S.J., has an excellent piece on why one should continue to bother to be Catholic here. It’s worth taking the time to digest.

What is unusual about our time is not opposition to or rejection of the truth of this revelation. Adversaries have been found in every era. What is new is the worry that radical changes have been made in an official way that would cause us to doubt the integrity of the original revelation.”

To indulge in the use of the perpendicular pronoun for a moment, I became Catholic, essentially, because the Church is either what she says she is – the temporal, physical, visible Church, founded by God albeit run by woefully imperfect men – or she is nothing more than the biggest pack of lies, con men and outright criminals the planet has ever hosted. That, to me, is the stark choice; there is no middle ground. I must keep reminding myself of this.

I do not know whether the Extraordinary Form is the "future of the Church" or not, although I think that is is. I also suspect that the Church will, in the future, be smaller and far more orthodox. However, I know, for sure, that for the past fifty years the Church has been dying the death of a thousand paper cuts, and that to continue “business as usual” as it has been conducted for the past fifty years leads only to oblivion.

Valete.

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Canonical penalties

For decades many Catholics (including me) have watched in disgust as senior prelates in these United States have remained silent while highly placed and unimaginably wealthy Catholic politicians have used their immense power and influence to further and expand the cause of abortion. Indeed, the USCCB and its minions have not only ignored this gob-smacking public scandal, they have smiled approvingly on, sought photo opportunities with, and truckled to, these people. It makes one want to puke.

From Religion News Service:

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops opened its spring meeting this week with a stern reproach of the Trump administration’s latest immigration policies, with the group’s president suggesting the new rules on asylum are a “right to life” issue.

Some bishops followed by urging protests, including “canonical penalties” for those who carry out the administration’s new rules.

Within minutes of opening the USCCB’s biannual meeting in Fort Lauderdale on Wednesday (June 13), Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the USCCB and archbishop of Galveston-Houston, read aloud a statement deeply critical of Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recent announcement regarding asylum qualifications…

At its core, asylum is an instrument to preserve the right to life,” DiNardo said, reading from the statement. “The Attorney General’s recent decision elicits deep concern because it potentially strips asylum from many women who lack adequate protection…

When he finished, DiNardo asked bishops to clap if they approved the statement. The room erupted in applause…

Bishop Edward Weisenburger of Tucson, Ariz., made a bolder suggestion, raising the possibility of implementing canonical penalties for Catholics “who are involved in this,” referring to children being separated from their families at the border. Canonical penalties can range from denial of sacraments to excommunication, though Weisenburger did not specify what he intended beyond referring to sanctions that already exist for “life issues.” (my emphasis)

To be clear, the United States has among the most permissive immigration and naturalization laws of any nation on the planet. Far more permissive than the Vatican. The United States has also, for decades, been incredibly loose and generous regarding those who ignore the law and come here illegally. The US hasn’t been as loose regarding illegal immigration as, say, countries of the European Union, but it has been far more lax than, say, the Vatican, Mexico or most other nations on the planet. But, currently, illegal immigration (not to be confused with legal immigration) has become a significant public policy problem in the US, as it has in the EU.

The more prosperous nations are obliged, to the extent that they are able, to welcome the foreigner in search of security and the means of livelihood which he cannot find in his country of origin…

Political authorities, for the sake of the common good… may make the exercise of the right to immigrate subject to various juridical conditions, especially with regard to the immigrants’ duties toward their country of adoption. Immigrants are obliged to respect with gratitude the material and spiritual heritage of the country that receives them, to obey its laws and to assist in carrying civic burdens.” Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2241 (my emphasis)

Prescinding from the simple fact that the very first act of one who crosses the border illegally is to disregard the laws of “the country that receives” him, regulation of immigration is absolutely a matter within the territory of legitimate governmental regulation. Control of illegal immigration (remember, we are not discussing legal immigration) is not a “right to life” issue, it is a complex matter of balancing charity to those who have already broken our laws with fairness and justice to the citizens and legal immigrants who have not broken our laws. The United States is a large and wealthy country, and can, and has, and still does, warmly accept those who come here legally and want to contribute to, and be a part of, our civilization. But the US is not a bottomless pit, and the US cannot correct all the ills of the world, or the dysfunction of other nations – we are struggling enough with our own dysfunctions.

Catholics may disagree regarding solutions to the profoundly difficult problem of decades of massive illegal immigration in the country, and its heavy aftermath, while remaining within the bounds of justice and charity. For the USCCB to call for canonical penalties against those who are upholding the laws – which are not unjust and which are attempting to deal fairly to all concerned in a nearly impossible situation – while simultaneously ignoring (and by their example, endorsing) the ongoing scandal of politicians who enact pro-abortion laws – is itself a source of scandal, and clerical malpractice. That, in a nutshell, is that.

Curate, ut valeatis.

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Sacrament Mass at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Portland, Maine, 3 June 2018

Here are some photos of the Mass for Confirmation and First Holy Communion in the Extraordinary Form, with the Most Reverend Robert P. Deeley, Bishop of Portland, Maine. It was held in the Side Chapel of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, at noon.

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There were seven children total: 5 for First Communion and all 7 for Confirmation. Also present at the Mass were three brothers of the Canons Regular of St. Thomas Aquinas House.

 The Canons Regular of St Thomas Aquinas House are (L-R) Br. Ryan, Br. Michael, and Br. Joseph (with Fr. Parent)

The Canons Regular of St Thomas Aquinas House are (L-R) Br. Ryan, Br. Michael, and Br. Joseph (with Fr. Parent)

The Mass was brought to you by the St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy. Photo credits to Matthew Maloney, Sandra Smith and Diane Embry (as well as the editing corrections! Thanks!!)

 

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Some of the brothers were also sponsors for the children of one of the families:

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So, congratulations to the children and their families, and THANK YOU Bishop Deeley and Fr. Parent!

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Valete!

Archbishop Sample's Homily at the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, DC, 28 April 2018

We discussed the Pontifical Solemn High Mass at the Basilica of the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception on 28 April 2018 here and here. The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter has provided a detailed report (with pictures and an embedded video) here; the Mass was in the presence of 4000 faithful, and 100 clergy, religious and altar servers.

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The theme of the Archbishop’s homily was Pope Benedict XIV’s Apostolic Letter SUMMORUM PONTIFICUM on the 10th anniversary of its promulgation. Snippets of the homily, the full text of which is at The Wanderer:

“… As we gather here today in this magnificent basilica, one cannot help but notice the very large presence of young people who have come to participate in this Mass. I have met a good number of you personally. You are a great sign of encouragement and hope for the Church, tossed about these days on the troubled waters of secularism and relativism.

As they say, “You get it.” You understand your place in the world and in the Church to help rebuild a culture of life in society and a renewal of Catholic culture within the Church herself…

Now I do not want to be misunderstood. I am not at all calling into question the liturgical reform that was actually called for by the Second Vatican Council. Nor am I calling into question the validity, legitimacy, or even goodness of the Missal promulgated by Blessed Paul VI.

But perhaps in the actual implementation of the council’s directives, not everything that occurred has borne good fruit. And certainly through liturgical abuses, other aberrations, or simply a poor ars celebrandi, the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite has too often been disfigured and has been experienced as a rupture with the past. (my emphasis)

So young people have discovered this form of the sacred liturgy as part of their own Catholic heritage…

As he says, there cannot and should not be a rupture between the two forms. One must be able to recognize the older Roman Rite in the newer…

I often get the impression that many people in the Church live their lives of faith as if the Church sort of hit a “reset button” at Vatican II, and that the past no longer has relevance, especially regarding the sacred liturgy.

There must be further liturgical growth and development along the lines of a hermeneutic of continuity with the past, and any experience of rupture must come to an end. May it be so…”

Go to The Wanderer link to read the full text. The video is here.

Valete.

PS: The Paulus Institute, which was instrumental in bringing has a gofundme page to help with the rather hefty expenses. Please consider it.

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On truth and beauty.

From the Catholic Herald:

Catholicism is a visual religion. In Catholicism, you look at things and there is usually plenty to look at. Moreover, Catholicism prepares you for eternal life where you will look at the Beatific Vision forever. So, what you look at here on earth is an encouragement to strive for heaven, and a taste of heaven on earth… the embroidery on a chasuble is the prayer of the person who made it, and its intricacy of design exists to stir up a similar prayer in the heart of the beholder.”

When I was stationed at the US Naval Hospital in Naples, Italy, we had the chance to take tours of churches. Lots of churches. There is a church on every corner, and even the lowliest of them exceeds anything we have here in these United States in terms of beauty and intricacy. I recall the first time I entered one of these places, along with a bunch of other tourists. Standing at the back of the church, and looking forward, my eye was drawn every upwards and forwards: there was just too much to take in. Every nook, cranny, crevice and crack was filled with something: a carving, a painting, a staining; whatever it was, it was something that was the product of all of someone’s skill, patience, undivided attention, time, and, yes, love, love in the truly Catholic sense of willing the best for the other.

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Of course, those thousands of unknown someones who produced each of these tens (hundreds?) of thousands of tiny, intricate little, and often not so little, things, not to mention those someones who integrated all those things as parts of a very great whole, did it for pay. Of course they did it for pay. Most of us – me included – do what we do for a buck.

“But in the end,” to paraphrase Lieutenant Barney Greenwald, the defense lawyer in one of my favorite novels, The Caine Mutiny*, “what is it that you do for a buck?”

Well, for a buck, all of these long dead someones built beautiful churches, put all of their time and attention and skill and intellect and heart and soul into the ten thousand little, and not so little, things, and, in so doing, made beautiful things for God. And they did something else, as well. When you stand at the back of one of these churches, and let your gaze be drawn ever upwards and forwards, trying to take is all in, eventually your gaze comes to rest on a tiny figure barely visible in the far distance, up on the massive altar. The figure is always there, in every church you go into. The figure is always more or less the same, no matter how large, ornate or elaborate the altar and surroundings. The little figure is nearly naked, his head hangs down, his body slumps, suspended by his hands nailed to a cross. And it struck me, standing there at the back of the church, that maybe this is what the long dead someones were trying to say.

“This”, they were saying to me, “this is what we think heaven is like. Or at least it’s as close as we can come.”

“And this”, they seemed to be whispering as my eyes were drawn to the tiny, far away figure, “is how we showed our gratitude.”

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Not so long ago, I had the occasion to attend Mass at church I don’t normally go to. It was a little white clapboard church, built in the 19th century, but well preserved. Inside, it was clean, to be sure, and in decent shape. But something was different. Outside, it looked much as it had a century ago. Inside, the sanctuary had been gutted. The altar rails were gone, the various statues were gone, leaving empty alcoves and, most importantly, the high altar was gone. The outline was still there, painted bland white; I imagine it only remained because to remove it would have required the destruction and rebuilding of the entire rear wall. But the altar was gone, only the ghost remained. From the old outline one could guess that the altar had been a work of beauty and love, a visual centerpiece of the masses said there. And, along with the altar and, of course, the altar rail, had gone all the accouterments: candle stands, altar cloths, tabernacle veils and frames, communion vessels, patens, the crucifix, all the stuff that had once been so central to this little church. Who knows where it went. All that remained was the lonely tabernacle, devoid of any coverings, sitting naked on a little pedestal. I felt ashamed that my contemporaries had seen fit to destroy and obliterate the work of beauty and love and sacrifice that generations past – people far poorer than we – had worked to build.

In its place is a “memorial table” (this altar with legs is sometimes and in some circles known as a Cranmer table), and some candle stands that can only be described as “cheap”. Don’t misunderstand, everything is clean, and reasonably well cared for. But the past, the tradition and heritage, the visual reminders of those who had gone before us, and sacrificed for those yet to come in their future – us - had been deliberately obliterated. The Mass itself was a sing-along, c.1983, with guitar accompaniment. Everybody held hands as often as possible, and especially during the guitar strumming Our Father, hands held and raised, slightly waiving. Don’t misunderstand, everyone there was quite sincere, and quite enthusiastic about what they were doing. But visually, to the disinterested unchurched observer, it was not really very different from what the Baptists down the street do. In fact, the Baptists are much better at this sort of thing.

The Catholic Church is the visible Church. It is visual, audible, tactile. The Sacraments - as well as sacramentals - are real, physical things. This is because we are not angels, we have bodies, and live in the physical world, are moved by, and understand physical things. The past half century has been a time of experimentation with the obliteration of the most publicly visible aspects of the Church’s physical, tangible patrimony: the form of the church building, and the form of the Mass. How has the experiment worked out? From my worm’s eye view, the data is in and the result is incontrovertible to those who have eyes to see: the experiment has not worked worked out, not worked out at all.

Quid est pulchritudo?

Quid est veritas?

Valete.

* There are lots of quotables from The Caine Mutiny. One of my favorites: “The Navy is a master plan designed by geniuses for execution by idiots.” Into which of those two groups did I fall? Well, I wasn’t a designer...

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Abortion, Ireland, and Constitutions

From The National Catholic Register:

As of this writing, Irish voters are preparing to head to the polls to cast their ballots May 25 for something once considered utterly unimaginable in the Republic of Ireland: whether to repeal the Eighth Amendment to the Irish Constitution, which would effectively legalize abortion across the predominantly Catholic country.

The Eighth Amendment was passed in Ireland in 1983 by a national vote of 67%. It recognizes the equal right to life of the mother and the unborn child, which means that abortion in Ireland is illegal unless the mother’s health is endangered … Thirty-five years later, there is massive pressure from both inside and outside of Ireland to repeal a law that has historically been supported by the Irish people.

A “Yes” vote in the referendum … will unleash a process that abortion advocates openly say will lead to unlimited access to abortions up to 12 weeks. And it will not end there, as there are plans to include a legislative provision for abortion up to approximately 24 weeks… The United States is one of seven countries that permit elective abortions after 20 weeks. (my emphasis).

In these United States, we have the 14th Amendment, passed in 1868 to address the protection and rights of former slaves, essentially declaring the former slaves to be “persons”, biological human beings with the same protections under the laws as any other biological human beings. The relevant clause is that no state shall “deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.” (my emphasis) Former slaves were now persons in a juridical sense, and now protected under the Constitution.

There is, of course, a difference between biological “personhood” and juridical “personhood”. A biological human being is, in a natural or common-sense use sense, a “person”. Most of us do not refer to our dogs, chickens, tractors or paint brushes as “persons”. I said, most of us don’t. Those who do are, wittingly or not, giving human characteristics to (anthropomorphizing) their tractors and paint brushes, a topic beyond the confines of this little post. Be that as it may, in what is still majority usage, a person is a biological human being.

I suspect the same was true for the framers of the 14th Amendment. They didn’t discuss unborn children; neither did they discuss the mentally ill, the aged, the terminally ill, the severely handicapped, the tax-paying fully employed adults, or any other categories of biological human being (besides former slaves). They did, I think it is fair to say, simply assume that all human beings were persons, and clarified this in a juridical sense: the framers of the 14th Amendment equated juridical personhood with biological humanhood. After all, prior to the Amendment, slaves, although considered human beings by most (not all) folks, were nevertheless not equally protected under the law. They were not fully persons in a juridical sense. That was the problem the Amendment sought to rectify; that’s why it came into existence.

In making abortion legal, the task before the Supreme Court with Roe v. Wade was to get around this little problem in the 14th Amendment. They did so by simply proclaiming the unborn human being an unperson. There is precedent, of course; after all, the Court in Scott v. Sanford had upheld the assertion that slaves were chattel, and in that sense both the rationale slavery and the rational abortion are exactly the same: there can be classes of biological human beings who do not have full protection under the law. Reflecting in detail on the implications of juridical personhood is beyond the bounds of this little post, but briefly consider this: if the Supreme Court of the United States can decide who, for legal purposes, is a person, and who is not, who else, besides unborn humans, might one day find themselves in the category of unperson? Anyone, or anything, may, or may not, be a declared by the Supreme Court a legal person depending on the whims and passions of the moment.

We have already pretty much fouled up our own Constitution. May God help the Irish on Friday, to know and understand exactly what it is that they may be doing to theirs.

Valete.

PS: In these United States, of course, the slog against abortion continues. The most recent iteration is the Trump Administration’s rule to “prioritize abstinence education over contraception distribution in family planning funds.” According to Life Site News, some 20 attorneys general are suing to block this. Unsurprisingly, the Maine Attorney General is one of the twenty. I thought you might be interested.

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Stupid is as stupid does.

What don’t they get???

Recently, Life Site News did a piece on Cardinal Dolan defending the Met Gala. I’m not going to talk about the Met Gala, it was disgusting and blasphemous and that’s all I have to say about that. What struck me, though, was one of Dolan’s comments:

Boy, you talk about the public square – with some of the movers and shakers who were there – and they’re reminded of positive memories of the Church and of devotions, prayers, traditions, and liturgies, as many of them told me they were. This could only be for the good of the Church.” (my emphasis)

Really? Devotions, prayers, traditions, liturgies; these are all good for the Church? Why, then, isn’t the good Cardinal (and all the bishops) moving as rapidly as possible to return Tradition to the “mainstream” church?

Stupid is as stupid does.

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Pentecost (Whitsunsay)

From the Glossary of the Catechism of the Catholic Church:*

PENTECOST: The “fiftieth” day at the end of the seven weeks following Passover (Easter in the Christian dispensation). At the first Pentecost after the Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus, the Holy Spirit was manifested, given and communicated as a divine person to the Church, fulfilling the paschal mystery of Christ according to His promise (CCC paragraphs 726, 731; cf. 1287). Annually the Church celebrates the memory of the Pentecost event as the beginning of the new “age of the Church,” when Christ lives and acts in and with His Church (para. 1076).

Awhile back we started looking at the similarities, and the differences, between the new Liturgical Calendar - which was promulgated in 1969 according Paul VI’s Motu proprio MYSTERII PASCHALIS - and the Liturgical Calendar which had been in use prior to MYSTERII PASCHALIS, the so called “1962 Calendar” which is followed by the Extraordinary Form (the EF, or the “Traditional Latin Mass”). This new calendar was part of the overall revision of the Mass with the promulgation of the 1969 Edition of the Roman Missal – the Novus ordo missae (also known as the OF or “Ordinary Form”)**. I promised, back then, to point out some of the differences in the calendars as we come across them in our journey through the Liturgical Year. We find ourselves at another difference.

Let us jog our memories. In the 1962 Calendar, there were only two main parts, or “Cycles”, to the Liturgical Year: The Christmas Cycle and the Easter Cycle. In the 1969 Calendar, things are broken up a bit differently: There’s Advent, Christmas Time (Christmas Vigil up to the Sunday after Epiphany or after January 6th), the first Ordinary Time, Lent/Triduum/Easter (ending on Pentecost Sunday), and the second ordinary Time.

In the 1962 Calendar, the Christmas Cycle had a season after Epiphany (January 6th) known, cleverly enough, as The Season after Epiphany, and it had up to six Sundays depending on the location of Ash Wednesday. This Season After Epiphany (and, the entire Christmas Cycle) ended the Saturday before Septuagesima Sunday, thus allowing one to sort of slide out of Christmas without abrupt jolts. Likewise, Septuagesima Sunday began the second half of the Liturgical year, the Easter Cycle, as the first of the three pre-Lenten Sundays whose purpose was to help us get ready for the period of Fast and Abstinence known as Lent. My simple-minder way of viewing this was that they allowed a sort of winding down of Christmas, and a gearing up for Lent. These transition periods were eliminated in the 1969 Calendar; right after Epiphany (which may or may not fall on Epiphany, January 6th) we are thrust into the first of the two periods of “Ordinary Time”. This first Ordinary Time ends abruptly on Ash Wednesday.

A similar thing happens with Pentecost. In the 1962 Calendar, and in my Baronius Press 1962 Daily Missal, Pentecost Sunday is also referred to as Whitsunday, referring to the white garments of those baptised during the vigil. Whitsun was, in the 1962 Calendar, a First Class Feast with an Octave week, meaning that there was a unique liturgy for each day of the Octave. Now, the kind and number of feasts and Octaves in the liturgical year have gone up and down through the centuries; suffice it to say that by the 1950’s things were pretty complicated and confusing, and Pope Pius XII simplified things greatly with his General Roman Calendar of 1954, where (among other things) he reduced the number of Octaves from some fifteen or so to three: Christmas, Easter and Pentecost. These three Octaves were carried forward by Pope Paul VI in his General Roman Calendar of 1960, which in turn came from his motu proprio Rubricarum instructum. As it is the 1960 General Roman Calendar that forms the 1962 Missal which is used by Summorum pontificum, we have, in our 1962 Missal Whitsunday, a.k.a. Pentecost, as well as the Octave week of Pentecost.

Thusly, in the 1962 Calendar (and Missal) we have Pentecost, or Whitsunday, followed by the Octave (there are Ember Days during this Octave; one day, but not today, we will discuss Ember Days). The Sunday after Pentecost is Trinity Sunday; this Sunday begins the third part of the Easter Cycle: the Season After Pentecost, which runs up to the First Sunday of Advent.

In the 1969 Calendar (and Missal), Easter Season ends with Pentecost, the Octave of Pentecost is suppressed. Badda bing, badda boom. Thus, there are only two Octaves in the 1969 calendar: Christmas and Easter. The second Ordinary Time begins the Monday after Pentecost, although the Sunday after Pentecost remains Trinity Sunday. Ordinary Time II, of course, runs up until the First Sunday of Advent, when we begin the new liturgical year.

There it is.

Valete.

* A short post on the development of the current Catechism is here.

** From an older post I offer up this clarification on names for the Rites: “One of the first things one comes up against regarding the Extraordinary Form is the problem of what to call it. It goes by many names, although in this blog I tend to use EF (“Extraordinary Form”) for the Vetus ordo – Old order of the Mass, and OF (Ordinary Form) for the Novus ordo – New order. I do this because that’s how Summorum Pontificum refers to them. Simply calling it "the Latin Mass" is, though widely practiced, not truly accurate, as much of the OF is actually supposed to be said in Latin (and in some parishes in other Dioceses, this is done.)

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Scarborough Chapter of Magnificat Prayer Breakfast Saturday 19 May 2018 (SOLD OUT!!)

See HERE for details and registration information. The following tidbits are taken from the website link, there's more on the website:

"About Our Speaker: Susan Conroy

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Susan Conroy first journeyed to India between her junior and senior years at Dartmouth College after being inspired by Mother Teresa’s efforts there on behalf of the Poorest of the Poor.She journeyed alone to Calcutta with the dream of helping Mother Teresa to care for the destitute in children’s orphanages and in the Home for the Dying.

She developed a friendship with Mother Teresa which lasted throughout the course of eleven years, and her experiences are chronicled in her first book: Mother Teresa’s Lessons of Love & Secrets of Sanctity, which was written with Mother Teresa’s own blessing and approval.  It was published in 2003.

Susan has made numerous television appearances, for local as well as worldwide audiences. She hosted a 13-part full-season series called “Speaking of Saints” on EWTN, a global television network that reaches over 200 million households worldwide.  She welcomed EWTN to Maine to tape a new series about finding Jesus Christ in the world today and thus finding eternal salvation.  These new episodes were filmed along the Coast of Maine as well as in view of Maine’s tallest peak, Mount Katahdin.  It is called “Coming to Christ,” and it began airing in 2014...

Most recently, in 2016, Susan released a treasure entitled Praying with Mother Teresa, filled with beautiful quotations by Mother Teresa and various other saints, some never-before-published photographs of our newly-canonized Saint, as well as prayers that Mother Teresa herself prayed..."

Registration and details at the top of the page.

Valete.

Ascension Thursday 10 May Anno Domini MMXVIII

The Thursday of the Sixth Week of Easter is, in these United States, the Solemnity of the Ascension of the LORD. In some Diocese, this Solemnity has been moved to the Seventh Sunday of Easter, thus it becomes “Ascension Thursday Sunday” (or something…)

But we are blessed here, and Ascension Thursday is on Thursday. From the website of the Diocese of Portland, Maine:

The Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord occurs 40 days after Christ's resurrection and is the important, final piece of the paschal mystery, which began with Christ's passion and death. Because Christ ascended, we, as members of the Body of Christ, also look forward to ascending into heaven after our bodily resurrection.

On the solemnity, we are also reminded of our evangelizing mission. Before Christ ascends, he gives his disciples final instructions, telling them to await the arrival of the Holy Spirit and then "go into the whole world and proclaim the Gospel to every creature" (Mark 16:15). We will celebrate the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the apostles on Pentecost Sunday, May 20. During the days between the Solemnity of the Ascension and the Solemnity of Pentecost, we are called to intense prayer for the coming of the Holy Spirit. This time of prayer comprises a novena.

While some ecclesiastical provinces have transferred the celebration of the Ascension of the Lord to the Seventh Sunday of Easter, that is not the case in the province of Boston, of which the Diocese of Portland is a part. Here, the celebration remains on the proper Thursday and is a holy day of Obligation.”

A list of Mass times by city and town (also from the Diocesan website) is here.

Valete.

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A cry of the heart.

It goes like this:

“We urgently need the Church’s clarity and authoritative guidance on issues like abortion, homosexuality, gender dysphoria, the indissolubility of matrimony, the four last things, and the consequences of contraception (moral, anthropological, and abortifacient). My generation has never, or rarely, heard these truths winsomely taught in the parishes. Instead, we hear most forcefully and frequently from our bishops' conference and our dioceses regarding the federal budget, border policy, net neutrality, gun control, and the environment…

… If the Church abandons her traditions of beauty and truth*, she abandons us.”

Thus goes a letter from a young man, married, and the father of three children. He wrote it to Archbishop Charles Chaput, who reproduced it in First Things, here.

A brief personal anecdote: when we still lived in Virginia, and attended St. Benedict's Parish, one of my daughters, around 11 years old at the time, invited a neighbor girl to spend the night. This little girl lived up the street, her parents were in the process of getting divorced, her father was not living at home and her mother had a new boyfriend. I do not know what their religion was, if any. It is possible the little girl had never been inside a church in her life. Nevertheless, she had her mother’s permission to go with us to Mass that Sunday, and she did. And I could tell by the look on her face that, though she wasn’t real sure exactly what was going on, she knew that something was going on, and it was important.

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We moved away not too long after. I do not know what became of the little girl.

                                                                                 ***

How we pray – the Church’s visible, public attitude of prayer - is important. It is the most visible aspect of Catholic life to non-Catholics, and says without words more than truckloads of verbiage can ever say about what the Church teaches about who we are, and Who God is. And, it gives foundation to figuring how to address all those other difficulties that come up in this life. If we worship like grownups, there’s a better chance that, just maybe, we might think like grownups.

To me, the silence of many – most - Dioceses, Bishops and priests on the ever-proliferating tough problems, the collapse of vocations to the priesthood and consecrated life, the emptying of the pews and the closing of churches have, at their root, a loss of Catholic identity, Catholic patrimony, and even a loss of an awareness that there is something known as truth. Catholics have been deprived of their heritage, and have been given Pablum instead. Returning to the traditional Mass won’t magically or instantaneously fix all this (I have been accused, in writing, by prelates, of believing that this is so) but I do believe it is the first step of a thousand and one steps. And, I believe, with all my heart, that it is a necessary step. As we pray, we believe.

Valete.

* As you may know, there is a confusing discussion going on right now in the blogosphere and beyond regarding “truth”. I refer you to Fr. Gerald Murray’s analysis here, and some follow on commentary from Fr. Zuhlsdorf here. Pilate’s question remains with us always: Quid est veritas?

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Pontifical Solemn High Mass at the Basilica of the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, DC, 28 April 2018 (Follow up)

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From The National Catholic Register:

WASHINGTON — The grandeur and beauty of Catholic worship were in full array as Archbishop Alexander Sample celebrated a Pontifical High Mass at the National Shrine of the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception Saturday afternoon.

Sacred ministers — including deacons, subdeacons, two deacons and a subdeacon of the cross — diocesan priests and priests in the habits of the Dominican, Franciscan and Oratorian orders, and two Eastern rite clergy, along with vested laymen and laywomen of several Catholic orders of chivalry, walked up the basilica’s long aisle in solemn procession.

A capacity crowd had gathered in the basilica’s vast Upper Church, which seats 3,500, to hear and see Archbishop Sample, of Portland, Oregon, celebrate Mass in the extraordinary form according to Pope St. John XXIII’s 1962 Missale Romanum...

So begins the most excellent NCR article dated 30 April 2018. We talked about it a bit here at Una Voce Maine. The Mass was sponsored by The Paulus Institute for the Propagation of Sacred Liturgy, and there are interesting details (to me, anyway) on their NEWS tab up at the top bar. They have detailed information on the music program, and a list of the Sacred Ministers. The Celebrant was the Most Reverend Alexander K. Sample, Archbishop of Portland in Oregon. The Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter was heavily represented among the Deacons, Subdeacons and other Ministers, as was the Institute of Christ the King, Sovereign Priest. I don’t as yet know how to embed videos, but I sure can embed the URLs for ‘em, and the video for this Mass is here.

I do, however, know how to grab pictures, so I grabbed some from the NCR article. But, as I said, go there and read the entire article: it’s very informative!

Valete!

PS: The Paulus Institute has a gofundme page to help with the rather hefty expenses. Please consider it.

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REMINDER!!! TWO UPCOMING EVENTS IN MAY!!!

Event ONE: Maine Catholic Women's Conference May 5th 2018 8AM-4:30PM

That's THIS SATURDAY, folks!!

Here's the flyer, there's also information at the Diocesan website HERE. There will be an Una Voce Maine table there, along with a plethora of other tables. Details are also on the sidebar.

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Event TWO: Scarborough Chapter of Magnificat Prayer Breakfast May 19th

See HERE for details and registration information. The following tidbits are taken from the website link, there's more on the website:

"About Our Speaker: Susan Conroy

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Susan Conroy first journeyed to India between her junior and senior years at Dartmouth College after being inspired by Mother Teresa’s efforts there on behalf of the Poorest of the Poor.She journeyed alone to Calcutta with the dream of helping Mother Teresa to care for the destitute in children’s orphanages and in the Home for the Dying.
She developed a friendship with Mother Teresa which lasted throughout the course of eleven years, and her experiences are chronicled in her first book: Mother Teresa’s Lessons of Love & Secrets of Sanctity, which was written with Mother Teresa’s own blessing and approval.  It was published in 2003.
Susan has made numerous television appearances, for local as well as worldwide audiences. She hosted a 13-part full-season series called “Speaking of Saints” on EWTN, a global television network that reaches over 200 million households worldwide.  She welcomed EWTN to Maine to tape a new series about finding Jesus Christ in the world today and thus finding eternal salvation.  These new episodes were filmed along the Coast of Maine as well as in view of Maine’s tallest peak, Mount Katahdin.  It is called “Coming to Christ,” and it began airing in 2014...
Most recently, in 2016, Susan released a treasure entitled Praying with Mother Teresa, filled with beautiful quotations by Mother Teresa and various other saints, some never-before-published photographs of our newly-canonized Saint, as well as prayers that Mother Teresa herself prayed..."
 

Regularly scheduled TLM's in Maine

Here is a review of the times and locations of Extraordinary Form (EF) Masses in Maine, as of April, 2018. Please note: All the times and locations are on the sidebar as well as this post.

The St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy sponsors two EF's every Sunday. The first is at 8:30 AM in the upstairs (main sanctuary) of the Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul, 122 Ash Street, Lewiston.

The second is at Noon, in the side chapel of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, 307 Congress Street, Portland

In addition, on First Saturdays at 7 AM there is a Mass, also at Saints Peter and Paul Basilica 122 Ash Street, Lewiston, but this one is in the downstairs chapel (not upstairs in the main sanctuary). This one may be discontinued later in the spring/summer of 2018 due to priest transfer, but at least as of now (April 2018) it is still going.

Also, Third Sundays 9:15am"Missa Cantata"St. Anthony Franciscan Monastery28 Beach Avenue, Kennebunk (see sidebar for contact information; sorry, no pictures).

Other EF's pop up from time to time as "one offs", keep it tuned here for dates and times.

Valete.

So you're new to the Latin Mass...

An Una Voce Maine member sent me a couple of articles, and I thought I’d pass them along.

First we have Steve Skojec, manning up to come clean about his little Latin problem. You can feel his pain:

“ …I wanted to tell them. I wanted to get it off my chest. I wanted to scream from the rooftops, “I GO TO THE LATIN MASS AND I DON’T KNOW ANY FREAKING LATIN! DOES THAT MAKE ME LESS OF A PERSON? AM I SINGING THE SALVE REGINA CORRECTLY? DOES GOD EVEN LOVE ME?!?

But I kept my mouth shut. I had a family. A reputation to consider…”

As Tow Mater likes to say, “Yup, that’s funny right there…”

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But Skojec goes on:

“The Church recommends Latin for all. No less a pope than Pope St. John XXIII, who invoked the Second Vatican Council … spoke beautifully of the importance of Latin in the life of the Church in his apostolic constitution, Veterum Sapientia:

‘Of its very nature Latin is most suitable for promoting every form of culture among peoples. It gives rise to no jealousies. It does not favor any one nation, but presents itself with equal impartiality to all and is equally acceptable to all…’

The pope went on to order the bishops to ensure the study of Latin for those entering the priesthood and teaching theology...

As everyone now knows, his orders were disobeyed…”

Go there and read the whole thing. It’s funny, it is. But it’s also pretty serious.

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 Secondly, we have an article at The Liturgy Guy, here. I’ve snipped a bit, but do go and read the entire thing:

“If you are new to the Latin Mass, my recommendation to you is not to worry about how to participate. Put down the booklet all together. Watch and listen in the silence and let your prayer arise... Realize that during this Holy Hour, something magnificent is happening: Jesus Christ, the High Priest, is offering the Holy Sacrifice....

... the modern Roman Rite relies upon the spoken word. On the other hand, the Traditional Roman Rite communicates on various non-linguistic levels, relying heavily on ceremony to communicate what is happening. The spoken words are veiled behind a sacred language, and also veiled in silence because the Canon is prayed in a whisper..."

The priest who wrote the article is Fr. Eric Andersen, pastor of St. Stephen Catholic Church in Portland, OR. The Archbishop of Portland is Alexander Sample, a man known for his orthodoxy, articulate and brave defense of the faith (and especially the “hard teachings”), and an awareness of the importance and centrality of proper worship, as highlighted in his 2017-2019 Pastoral Priorites (a PDF is here).

I’ve snipped a few of Archbishop Sample’s priorities from the PDF:

PASTORAL PRIORITY: Divine Worship

Initiative A: Improve quality of liturgical music. Provide education & support for liturgical musicians. Train and inspire music ministers.

Initiative B: Increase the knowledge, reverence and effectiveness of all liturgical ministers.

Initiative C: Increase the lay faithful’s knowledge of and appreciation for the Mass.

Initiative D: Promote more consistency in the Mass experience (my emphasis) and ensure that it is in accord with the Church’s faithful celebration of the sacred liturgy. Provide liturgical education and training for the clergy and laity.

Initiative E: Promote a culture of hospitality in our parishes.

St. Stephen’s, by the way, is a church where the EF and the OF exist side by side, no? Check out their website and Mass schedule. I’ve mentioned other such churches in other posts, churches like St. Mary's Church in Norwalk, CT; Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church in Dunn, NC; St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church in Front Royal, VA; St. Mary of Pine Bluff, WI; St. Gianna Molla Parish in Northfield, NJ; St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Atlantic City, NJ. There are lots of others. Maybe I’ll put together a list someday, the point being to refute those who claim that bringing the EF to an existing OF parish is somehow destructive. On the contrary, it enlivens and enriches the parish more than the naysayers would ever have imagined!

                                                                      ***

Finally, there’s this: One of the first things one comes up against regarding the Extraordinary Form is the problem of what to call it. It goes by many names, although in this blog I tend to use EF (“Extraordinary Form”) for the Vetus ordo – Old order of the Mass, and OF (Ordinary Form) for the Novus ordo – New order. I do this because that’s how Summorum Pontificum refers to them. Simply calling it "the Latin Mass" is, though widely practiced, not truly accurate, as much of the OF is actually supposed to be said in Latin (and in some parishes in other Dioceses, this is done.) But go to "Whaddaya call that Mass anyway", Fr. Z’s post from a few years back to get a detailed, and amusing, overview of the thousand and one names for the Mass of All Time.

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PS: Here’s a new book. Haven’t read it, but I thought I’d pass on the link: Confessions of a Traditional Catholic

Valete