Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act S.311 25 Feb 2019

From the Maine Right to Life Committee in their Alerts section, we find this:

Your voice is needed to protect babies born alive after an abortion. The U.S. Senate is scheduled to vote Feb. 25, 2019 on the Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, S. 311.

In light of the radical trend that began with the signing of the Reproductive Health Act by Governor Andrew Cuomo (D-N.Y.) allowing abortion through all stages of pregnancy and removing explicit protections for babies born alive following a failed abortion, Congress needs to act now to protect unborn babies.

The Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act (S. 311), sponsored by Senator Ben Sasse (R-Ne.), would enact an explicit requirement that a baby born alive during an abortion must be given "the same degree" of care that would apply "to any other child born alive at the same gestational age," including transportation to a hospital…

“…Ask our Senators to vote in support of S.311, to protect unborn babies who survive a failed abortion from infanticide! Give these defenseless little ones the same protections as those born alive at the same age. All newborn babies must be afforded this fundamental legal protection…”

Contact Senator Susan Collins

Contact Senator Angus King

Curate, ut valeatis!

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An Open Leter from Cardinals Brandmuller and Burke.

Edward Pentin at the National Catholic Register provides us with an open letter from Cardinal Walter Brandmuller and Cardinal Raymond Burke,. Here is the full text (it’s not long):

Open Letter to the Presidents of the Conferences of Bishops

Dear Brothers, Presidents of the Conferences of Bishops,

We turn to you with deep distress!

The Catholic world is adrift, and, with anguish, the question is asked: Where is the Church going?

Before the drift in process, it seems that the difficulty is reduced to that of the abuse of minors, a horrible crime, especially when it is perpetrated by a priest, which is, however, only part of a much greater crisis. The plague of the homosexual agenda has been spread within the Church, promoted by organized networks and protected by a climate of complicity and a conspiracy of silence. The roots of this phenomenon are clearly found in that atmosphere of materialism, of relativism and of hedonism, in which the existence of an absolute moral law, that is without exceptions, is openly called into question.

Sexual abuse is blamed on clericalism. But the first and primary fault of the clergy does not rest in the abuse of power but in having gone away from the truth of the Gospel. The even public denial, by words and by acts, of the divine and natural law, is at the root of the evil that corrupts certain circles in the Church.

In the face of this situation, Cardinals and Bishops are silent. Will you also be silent on the occasion of the meeting called in the Vatican for this coming February 21st?

We are among those who in 2016 presented to the Holy Father certain questions, dubia, which were dividing the Church in the wake of the conclusions of the Synod on the Family. Today, those dubia have not only not had any response but are part of a more general crisis of the Faith. Therefore, we encourage you to raise your voice to safeguard and proclaim the integrity of the doctrine of the Church.

We pray to the Holy Spirit, that He may assist the Church and bring light to the Pastors who guide her. A decisive act now is urgent and necessary. We trust in the Lord Who has promised: “Behold I am with you all days, even to the consummation of the world” (Mt 28,20).

Walter Cardinal Brandmüller

Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke

Curate, ut valeatis.

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Ad orientem in the New York Post

From the New York Post, of all places, comes a piece by Chad Pecknold of Catholic University of America entitled Behind Ted McCarrick's fall: the wrong kind of 'openess'". Overall, it’s quite good, with a brief explanation of what “laicization” means:

“…In Catholic teaching, ordination to the priesthood “confers a gift of the Holy Spirit” that changes a man and his personal status. A man ordained to the priesthood has the right and duty to exercise a sacred power “which can only come from Christ himself through his church.” This imprint of God’s power can never be erased — but the church can remove an ordained man’s right to exercise the power of that imprint…”

But I was struck by this paragraph (my emphasis):

“… McCarrick is only the most ­extreme representative of such forgetfulness. Elsewhere, openness to the world has meant ­removing the crosses from Catholic classrooms or turning altars around to the face the people rather than the dying Jesus on the cross. Such openness has shifted not only the direction the priest faces during the Mass — but which way he faces in his heart…

This last is true for the people as well as the priest. And, I think people can understand this if it’s explained coherently rather than trivialized, dismissed and denigrated, as is generally the case when the issue comes up, especially in Catholic circles. How we do the Mass is central to how we live our lives as Catholics. It’s not perfect, ad orientem and/or the TLM won’t magically fix everything wrong in the Church – after all, what is the Church’s 2000 year history if not “troubled”. But it would be a good start.

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Septuagesima Sunday 17 February A.D. 2019

For those few of you in the State of Maine who are blessed enough to be able to attend regularly one of the two weekly Sunday Masses in the Extraordinary Form (8:30 AM at the Basilica in Lewiston, noon in the side chapel of the Cathedral in Portland, see sidebar for details), this Sunday begins the pre-Lenten season with Septuagesima Sunday. Fr. Z, naturally, does a piece on this little three week period here.

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For the rest of us, well, Paul VI expunged the pre-Lenten preparatory period in 1970, so, we have three more weeks of “Ordinary Time”, then Lent begins with Ash Wednesday (6 March).

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There it is.

Curate, ut valeatis.

Let Not Your Heart be Troubled

From the National Catholic Register, Cardinal Gerhard Müller, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith from 2012-2017, has given us a Manifesto of the Faith, “Let Not Your Heart be Troubled.” My emphasis:

In the face of growing confusion about the doctrine of the Faith, many bishops, priests, religious and lay people of the Catholic Church have requested that I make a public testimony about the truth of revelation. It is the shepherds' very own task to guide those entrusted to them on the path of salvation. This can only succeed if they know this way and follow it themselves...

Go read it yourself. Its only four pages: short and easy read, easy to understand. In a nutshell, as it were.

Valete.

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Latin Mass Schedule for February, 2019, in the Diocese of Portland, Maine

Noto bene: As for me, I have encountered a sharp but hopefully transient increase in work related demands for the next couple of months. Thus, while I shall keep the dates of upcoming TLM Masses up to date – to the extent that I know about them - you will not be hearing much else from me. Perhaps that is a blessing.

Please feel free to E-mail me at info@unavocemaine.org or timothy.collins3@va.gov with additions, deletions or corrections.

FIRST SATURDAY MASS Saturday, 2 February2019.

Contact:
Fr. Steven Cartwright
Parochial Vicar - Sebago Lakes Region Parishes
Office Phone: 207-857-0490, ext. 22

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THIRD SUNDAY MASS (Traditional Latin Mass) Sunday, 17 February 2019

9:15am

"Missa Cantata"

St. Anthony Franciscan Monastery

28 Beach Avenue, Kennebunk

Confession available.

Overnight accommodations available, contact the Guest House: 207-967-4865

Contact the Monastery:

franciscanmonastery@yahoo.com

(207) 967-2011

PO Box 980

Kennebunkport, ME 04046

Also at the St. Anthony Francisca Monastery: FIRST SATURDAY DEVOTION TO OUR LADY OF FATIMA

Begins at 7:45AM, Novus Ordo Mass, Confessions Benediction, meditation and Rosary.

Contact the Monastery for more information (contact info as above)

And don’t forget, EVERY SUNDAY (courtesy of the Saint Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy):

8:30am
Saints Peter and Paul Basilica
122 Ash Street, Lewiston

12 noon
Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception
307 Congress Street, Portland

Curate, ut valeatis!

The End of Christmastime

Having safely passed the waypoint of the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, those of us navigating with the 1969 Novus ordo chart know that we have departed the Ocean of Christmastime and entered the Sea of Ordinary Time, v.1. Here we will make our way across the waters of the weeks until we pass the Point of Ash Wednesday, entering the Easter Sea via the Storms of Lent.

For those who are blessed enough to be able to follow the alternative chart of 1962, well, you are in a different part of the ocean of Christmas Cycle known as the Time After Epiphany. Here you will go until you, too, leave the Ocean of Christmas. But you will enter the Easter Sea via a different route, three weeks ahead of we who must use the newer chart. Your route does not recognize “Ordinary Time” but will take you by the “pre-Lenten” rocks of Septuagisema, Sexagesima and Quinquagisima Sundays. No matter, for you, too will end up at the same place: Ash Wednesday.

As for me, I have encountered a sharp but hopefully transient increase in work related demands for the next couple of months. Thus, while I shall keep the dates of upcoming TLM Masses up to date – to the extent that I know about them - you will not be hearing much else from me. Perhaps that is a blessing.

Curate, ut valeatis!

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Christmastime and Epiphany - a brief calendar review,

Christmas Time

Last year, I did an overview of how the Liturgical Year differs, and how it remains the same, across the two liturgical forms, the Novus Ordo (Ordinary Form or OF) and the Tridentine (Extraordinary Form or EF). I also loosely refer to them as the 1962 calendar (the calendar followed by the EF) and the 1969 calendar (the calendar followed by the OF). I also did a post on the period of Christmastime, and how it differs across the two calendars. The period we are in now, the period after Christmas, is particularly confusing, so I thought I would update and repost that post on Christmastime.

First, though, a note of caution: the purpose of these posts is simply to explain the differences, and the similarities between the two calendars. The Church can, and has, altered the Liturgical Calendar through the millennia. I’ve heard, for example, that once upon a time, Advent was 8 weeks, not 4. Sometimes changes seem for the better, other times not so much. But the Church has the authority to do this.

Finally, I was critiqued once for spending to much time on OF things. Well, truth is, we live in a Novus ordo world, and it is instructive to recognize the differences. Also, many of us – me, for example- simply don’t have recourse to an EF Mass, because there are so few to be had, and those that exist are all clustered around Portland, far from where I live. So, we go to Novus ordo Masses, like it or don’t.

1962 Calendar

Beginning with the EF, my Baronius Press 1962 Daily Missal tells me that the season of Christmas, or the Christmas Cycle, begins with the First Sunday of Advent, and ends with the Saturday before Septuagesima. This Cycle is also known as The Mystery of the Incarnation, and has three parts. Thus we have:

Part I of the Christmas Cycle. Advent: First Sunday of Advent (the Sunday closest to November 30th) up to the Vigil Mass on December 24th. The feast of the Immaculate Conception, a Holy Day of obligation in the US (being as Our Lady is, after all, the Patroness of these United States) is on December 8th. The 3rd Sunday of Advent is Gaudete (rejoice!) Sunday. Note that the Ember Days for Advent also occur during Advent. These are days of recommended (not obligatory) fasting; in Advent they occur on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday after the 3rd Sunday of Advent. The subject of Ember Days probably should have its own post someday.

Part II of the Christmas Cycle. Christmastide: Begins with the Vigil Mass, December 24th, (which I believe in the 1962 calendar must span midnight) and runs through Epiphany.

Now things get a little confusing. Right after Christmas Day comes the days of the Octave of Christmas; these have their own Masses, with Decembers 26, 27 and 28 are the Masses of St. Stephen, St. John the Evangelist, and the Holy Innocents, respectively. Decembers 69, 30 and 31 are just called 5th, 6th and 7th days in the Octave. If a Sunday happens to fall in there, it gets its own Mass, the Sunday within the Octave. Then comes the Octave, January 1st, previously known as the Mass of the Circumcision (I think), as under the Jewish Law, it was on the 8th day of life that the boy was to be circumcised. Now it is known as the Octave Day of Christmas.

On the Sunday after the Octave Day of Christmas comes the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus. Now, if this Sunday happens to fall on January 1st, 6th or 7th, then the Holy Name Feast is kept on January 2nd. Except when it isn’t. Current calendars for the EF available to me differ slightly on this point. Anyways, the days of January 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th are Feria (non feast) masses with their own designated readings, Collects, Introits and so forth.

What we can be sure of, though, is that in the 1962 calendar, Epiphany falls on Epiphany, the 12th Day of Christmas, January 6th..

The Octave of the Epiphany is January 13th, the Baptism of the Lord.

Part III of the Christmas Cycle: Season after Epiphany: Now things get a bit more straightforward. Each Sunday after Epiphany (As many as 6 depending on when Ash Wednesday comes) gets its own Mass, and the days in between are Ferias interdigitated with various saints’ feast days. This season runs up to the Saturday prior to Septuagesima Sunday. Thus endeth the Christmas Cycle in the Extraordinary Form, according to the 1962 Liturgical Calendar. The periods known as Ordinary Time are not present in the 1962 calendar.

Et nunc,

How does Christmas time work in the 1969 Calendar? The USCCB promulgates the Liturgical Calendar for these United States every year, the USCCB calendar website is here, the link for the calendar PDF is here.

1969 Calendar

Advent: Using my handy and dandy Daily Roman Missal, Third Edition I find that, as in the EF, Advent runs from the First Sunday of Advent up to First Vespers of Christmas, essentially Sunset of Christmas Eve (which is when the Vigil Mass is often held). As in the EF, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception is on December 8th, and Gaudete is still the Third Sunday, but the Ember Days are all gone. Indeed, all of the Ember Days throughout the year were expunged from the 1969 calendar. Other than that, things are pretty similar to the EF.

Christmas Time: Begins December 24th at First Vespers (Evening Prayer I, which is essentially sundown). The Octave is pretty much as in the 1962 calendar, although the Octave Day (1 January) is the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. In the 1962 calendar, this feast is not a solemnity, and is on October 11th.

Next up is Epiphany. In the Dioceses of the United States, Epiphany is on the Sunday that falls between January 2 and January 8. If that Sunday happens to be the 6th of January, then Epiphany is on Epiphany. If that Sunday happens to be not January 6th (Epiphany), then Epiphany is celebrated on that Sunday anyway and January 6th in that case is just another day. Now, this period around the 1st of the year is already confusing, as we saw in the 1962 calendar, it is doubly so in the 1969 calendar, because we have two factors that move: the days of the week change relative to the calendar dates (normal), and the date of Epiphany moves, to keep it on a Sunday (less normal). This, in turn, necessitates extra set(s) of weekday readings. If you are not following this and are getting a headache, don’t worry. It’s only in these United States that this goes on. In the rest of the Roman Catholic world, at least so far as I know, they celebrate Epiphany on Epiphany. Or, maybe they don’t.

The Feast of the Baptism of the Lord ends Christmas Time, but it isn’t celebrated at the Octave of Epiphany, as it is in the 1962 calendar. It can be anywhere from 1 to 7 days after Epiphany which, as we saw, has no fixed date either. To recap: in the 1962 calendar, Epiphany is on Epiphany, January 6th, and the Baptism of the Lord is January 13th. The Season After Epiphany, Part III of the Christmas Cycle, can vary in length, but it always ends the evening before Septuagesima Sunday. Spetuagesima Sunday, in turn, is always three Sundays before Ash Wednesday, and nine Sundays before Easter. Always. It’s easy to keep oriented to where you are in the year.

In the 1969 calendar, Epiphany is sometime between January 2nd and January 8th, and the Baptism or the Lord (and the end of Christmas Time) is 1 to 7 days after that. Some years, like last year, Christmas Time can end rather abruptly, with the Baptism falling the day after Epiphany, which was placed that year on January 7th. On the other hand, in this year – 2019 – the Novus ordo Epiphany happens to fall on the actual Epiphany, January 6th.. So, in the 1969 calendar, if you find yourself feeling slightly disoriented after January 1st, well, don’t worry about it. The USCCB isn’t.

After the Baptism of the Lord (1969 calendar) Christmas Time is over, and we go into the first of the two rounds of “Ordinary Time”. There are no “pre-Lenten Sundays” (Septuagesima, Sexagesim, Quinquagesima). So, there it is.

Curate, ut valeatis.

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1962 calendar

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1969 calendar

Latin Mass Schedule for January, 2019, in the Diocese of Portland, Maine

Noto bene: I post times and places of Latin Masses in the Diocese, to the extent that I know of them. Please feel free to E-mail me at info@unavocemaine.org or timothy.collins3@va.gov with additions, deletions or corrections. Happy New Year!

FIRST SATURDAY MASS this Saturday, 5 January 2019.

Contact:
Fr. Steven Cartwright
Parochial Vicar - Sebago Lakes Region Parishes
Office Phone: 207-857-0490, ext. 22

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And don’t forget, EVERY SUNDAY (courtesy of the Saint Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy):

8:30am
Saints Peter and Paul Basilica
122 Ash Street, Lewiston

12 noon
Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception
307 Congress Street, Portland

Curate, ut valeatis!

Adeste, fideles, laeti triumphantes, in Anno Domini MMXVIII

Latin Masses on New Year’s Day:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Noon: Sung Mass at the Basilica in Lewiston (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

***

For whatever it’s worth, a literal rendering of Adeste, Fideles laeti triumphantes comes out as “Be present! Faithful, happy, victoriously marching ones.” I had help, of course, from Professor Hans-Friedrich Mueller but no matter.

Anyway, here’s the entire piece, and may God bless you all in this Christmas Season! See you in January.

Curate, ut valeatis!

1. Adeste Fideles laeti triumphantes,
Veníte, veníte in Bethlehem.
Natum vidéte, Regem Angelorum:

Veníte adoremus,
Veníte adoremus
Veníte adoremus Dóminum

2. Deum de Deo, lumen de lúmine,
gestant puellae viscera
Deum verum, genitum non factum:

Veníte adoremus,
Veníte adoremus
Veníte adoremus Dóminum

3. Cantet nunc io chorus Angelórum
cantet nunc aula caelestium:
Gloria in excelsis Deo:

Veníte adoremus,
Veníte adoremus
Veníte adoremus Dóminum

4. Ergo qui natus, die hodierna
Jesu, tibi sit glória
Patris aeterni Verbum caro factum:

Veníte adoremus,
Veníte adoremus
Veníte adoremus Dóminum

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Schedule of Christmas Masses in the Extraordinary Form, Diocese of Porltand, Maine, Anno Domini MMXVIII

MIDNIGHT MASS 12AM St. Anthony of Padua

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Christmas Day:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Noon: Sung Mass at the Basilica in Lewiston (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

New Year’s Day:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Noon: Sung Mass at the Basilica in Lewiston (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

On the Stability of the Latin Mass in these times of chaos.

From the National Catholic Register:

I think it’s the uncertainty that everything seems to be shifting and the [traditional] Mass itself is stable,” Joseph said. “It doesn’t change.”

I have never had the sense of peace in the Novus ordo that I had back in the day when we were able to go to a local Vetus ordo parish. Since it was an FSSP parish, we didn’t feel like we were second class citizens, relegated to a side chapel, the basement, or an inconvenient Mass time. The Mass was reverent, it was predictable, it was not about the priest drawing attention to himself or the people drawing attention to themselves. It was about God. The Mass was the Mass, it didn’t change, and that was that.

Michael Price is a 23-year-old former atheist who is taking a Catholic catechism class. He described himself as on the verge of converting and believes the traditional Latin Mass has been helping him in his conversion process.

It would be slow going otherwise,” he said, adding that the “atmosphere” he experienced at the Novus Ordo Masses has led him to want to leave. He said, “I don’t get that at all with the Latin Mass.” 

For Price, there’s something straightforward about the extraordinary form of the Mass.

Price thinks the traditional Latin Mass “really embodies the dogma and teaching of the Catholic Church better than the Novus Ordo does. A reason for that could be that that is the way the Mass has been for over 1,000 years. Being entrenched in that one manner of prayer and sacrifice really enabled that ritual, that Mass, to embody the dogma more effectively than the Novus Ordo, which was more recently instituted.”

The Mass is the Mass, and that is that. The article continues,

“’The whole orientation,’ Father Berg (of the FSSP parish in Rhode Island - TC) added, ‘focuses upon the offering of the sacrifice to God, rather than on the community, as in the new rite.’ Also, in the extraordinary form, he said, Catholics are reminded constantly of their kneeling before God and the humility they ought to have in offering sacrifice. ‘If that relationship with God is understood, we believe that relationship defines all your other relationships.’

I recommend the article to you – it is very good.

Curate, ut valeatis.

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December 17th is the last day for shopping...

… at the Dominican Nuns Cloister Shoppe!!!

They close down every year on December 17th (they’ll be back in January) because, well, they want to focus on the birth of Our Lord and Savior on Christmas Day. Was Jesus really born on Christmas Day? I believe He was.

Anyway, here’s some information on The Cloister Shoppe in particular and the nuns in general. We also discussed them here. So, help support them and get some nice stuff for Christmas, too.

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Curate, ut valeatis.

The Sacrifice of Fr. Schmitt, the Second Sunday of Advent, 1941.

American military chaplaincies predate the Constitution, as do both the Army and the Navy. The United States Navy was established by the Continental Congress on 13 October, 1775, and the first set of “Rules for the Regulation of the Navy of the United Colonies” (commonly known as “Navy Regulations”) were promulgated by the Second Continental Congress on 28 November, 1775. Within the second Article of this first set of Navy Regulations we find:

"...the Commanders of the ships of the thirteen United Colonies are to take care that divine services be performed twice a day on board and a sermon preached on Sundays, unless bad weather or other extraordinary accidents prevent."

Thus was born the United States Navy Chaplain Corps. Chaplains in the Armed Services are commissioned officers, and wear the uniform of branch in which they serve. Some chaplains serve for only a few years, others serve for an entire career. I served as a medical officer aboard two United States Navy warships: USS Wasp (LHD-1) and USS Nassau (LHA-4). Aboard both, at 2100 hours (9PM) some version of the following would be piped over the 1MC (public address from the bridge): “All hands stand by for the evening prayer.” The the chaplain would come on and offer a short prayer. Generic, to be sure, but a prayer, nevertheless. On Sundays and Holy Days of obligation, when a priest was available (he usually was flown over from another ship on the ‘holy helo’ yuk yuk) there was Mass, sometimes in the medical spaces, occasionally on the flight deck, assuming no flight ops, a rarity except when in port.

Which brings us to this from US Naval Institute News regarding Fr. Aloyius H. Schmitt, Lieutenant (junior grade), Chaplain Corps, USN, and his sacrifice on the morning of December 7th, 1941. LT (jg) Schmitt was serving as Catholic Chaplain aboard the battleship USS Oklahoma.

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The USS Oklahoma was the second of the Navy’s Nevada class battleships, laid down in 1912 and commissioned in 1916. Like many of the WW I era Navy ships, she underwent several modernizations through the period of the 1920s and 1930s, and eventually found herself as part of the Pacific Fleet moored that peaceful Sunday morning in berth F5, “Battleship Row”, Pearl Harbor Naval Base when the Imperial Japanese Navy carried out the sneak attack which brought the United States into World War II. The Oklahoma was torpedoed, capsized and sank during the attack.

From the Citation for Fr. Schmitt:

As Oklahoma was capsizing, Schmitt sacrificed his own life to assist many of his shipmates’ escape through an open porthole. Schmitt had been hearing confession when Oklahoma was hit by four torpedoes, according to the Navy.

Schmitt helped a small group of sailors escape, before he attempted getting through the porthole. He was struggling to get through when he noticed more sailors had entered the compartment he had been in, according to the Navy.

Schmitt realized the water was rapidly flooding the compartment, and soon this exit would be closed. Schmitt asked to be pushed back into the compartment, so others could escape, urging the sailors with a blessing, according to Navy. Oklahoma continued filling with water and capsized. More than 400 sailors, including Schmitt, died on Oklahoma…

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The USNI article continues:

Last year (2016-TC), (Fr.) Schmitt’s remains were positively identified using DNA testing and were re-interred at the Loras College chapel, which was dedicated to Schmitt, a 1932 graduate. A memorial to Schmitt in the chapel includes his chalice, prayer book, military medals and more of his personal belongings recovered in the ship’s wreckage. The book is still marked with a page ribbon for Dec. 8 prayers, according to Loras College…

Before Fr. Schmitt died, he saved 12 of his shipmates. Christ the King Chapel at Loras College was built in 1946 as a memorial to Fr. Schmitt. He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star on December 7th, 2017. Fr. Schmitt was the first American chaplain of any faith to die in World War II. December 7th, 1941 was the Second Sunday in Advent.

***

Since 1985, all Catholic chaplains (and, for that matter, all Catholics serving in the military and their families) fall under the Archdiocese for the Military Services USA) sometimes known as “AMS” or the “Military Ordinariate”) established by Pope John Paul II. Some details are here. For whatever it’s with, although the chaplains themselves are commissioned officers (and thus paid by their Service), that’s all that’s paid for. From the FAQ page (my emphasis):

The AMS is a church entity. It is not a part of the Armed Forces and is not funded by the federal government. It is a “home” mission diocese that depends almost entirely on financial support from individual donors including personal donations from its military and VA chaplains, gifts from military communities, gifts from dioceses, charitable bequests, and grants.

The military chaplains are members of the Armed Forces and, as such, are paid by the government. The AMS must pay all the considerable travel costs for its clergy to visit military installations around the world. They do not travel on military aircraft. The AMS receives limited support from certain US dioceses and foundations that support Catholic causes.

On a personal note, I and my wife went through RCIA under the auspices of the AMS while stationed in Italy, and we came into the Church in the military chapel at the Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy. I have been to I don’t know how many Masses offered by priests in the USN Chaplain service aboard several different warships, as well as in Italy, Spain, and various locals in the Persian Gulf. I cannot express how important these men have been to me in my life, and to others serving haze gray and underway.

USS Oklahoma

USS Oklahoma

Curate, ut valeatis.

Advent Lessons and Carols and the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception

This just in:

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And, don’t forget the schedule for this Saturday, 8 December 2018:

December 8th, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, 307 Congress St., Portland, ME (sponsored by St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Noon: Low Mass at St. Anthony of Padua. 268 Brown St, Westbrook, Maine

Contact: Fr. Steven Cartwright, Parochial Vicar - Sebago Lakes Region Parishes Office Phone: 207-857-0490, ext. 22

Noon: Sung Mass at the Saints Peter and Paul Basilica, 122 Ash Street, Lewiston, Maine (sponsored by St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Curate, ut valeatis.

Thoughts on the passing of Bishop Robert Morlino for this First Sunday of Advent, Anno Domini MMXVIII

We noted Bishop Robert Morlino’s sudden and unexpected passing on November 24th, 2018 here. There are many biographies on the Bishop, a reliable one is from the Diocesan paper, the Madison Catholic Herald. Fr. Z, who knew him well, has written a lot about him in recent days: go here for the archive. Pundits have written as well; Fr. Raymond deSouza wrote here, and one of the most complex eulogies is that of Rocco Palmo. Some have interpreted Rocco’s piece as a slam on the Bishop before the body is cold; I think it is an ode to a happy warrior.

Both the SSPX and the FSSP have weighed in as well.

Why is such a deal being made about all this? In my opinion, it is because the Bishop was a happy warrior, a man who was simply unafraid of the world, the culture, even what people and even other bishops said about him. From my distant vantage point, he appears to be a man who understood exactly what his job was, and went ahead and did it, and the heck with what people said about it. He didn’t answer to them, he answered to a higher authority.

Fr. Z wrote this (my emphases):

It was Bp. Morlino’s desire to provide the city and diocese with a new Cathedral church once again, which would have a crypt chapel for their bishops… The old cathedral burned down, due to arson, over a decade ago and has not been replaced…

To give you a sense of the sort of bishop he was, he shelved plans for a new cathedral in order to raise money for a foundation that would pay for formation for seminarians for the priesthood. When he took over the diocese, there were about 6 seminarians – total – and that was what was budgeted. However, under Bp. Morlino vocations soared to a high of some 34, and 24 now. As you can imagine, a budget for 6 was not adequate. He shelved his cathedral to build a “priests for the future” campaign. It was quite successful. He left that aspect in good shape. He also ordained 40 men for the diocese in his time...

Joseph Pearce wrote about how the Bishop understood the evangelizing power of beauty, and its importance in “cultural apologetics”, in the National Catholic Register. It is worth your time to read the entire article. A snippet:

At [Bishop Morlino’s] behest, I spoke of the good, the true and the beautiful as being a reflection of the Trinity, inseparable, coequal and yet mystically distinct. The good was the way of virtue or love; the true was the way of reason; the beautiful was the way of creation. In an age which had corrupted the meaning of love, removing its rational and self-sacrificial heart and replacing it with narcissistic feeling, and in an age which had corrupted reason to something merely relative and devoid of objectivity, the power of beauty to evangelize was more important than ever…

To me it seems that Bishop Morlino saw his job as saving souls, not superstructures (nevertheless understanding that one side benefit of a robust Church is robust superstructure; it’s all related), and he understood the importance of beauty – objective beauty – as well as clear and unambiguous orthodoxy in that job of leading souls to salvation.

The Diocese of Madison has a page here. This page lists Requiem and Memorial Masses being said, not just in Wisconsin but elsewhere in the country, and internationally.

EWTN will be broadcasting the funeral at 11AM, Tuesday, December 4th.

Thought you might be interested.

Curate, ut valeatis.

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Latin Masses in the Portland, Maine area in December, 2018, including a Midnight Mass (revised schedule).

We are in to Advent, the beginning of a new Liturgical Year, and there are a plethora of Masses to be offered in the Extraordinary Form in the Portland area in December! (Around seventeen altogether, if you include the “regular” Sunday 8AM and noon Masses).

There are three Extraordinary Form Masses to be at St. Anthony of Padua, located in St. Hyacinth Church, 268 Brown Street, Westbrook, ME 04092 (207-857-0490 or E-mail to: stanthonyparish@myfairpoint.net) For those who (like me) may be unfamiliar, Westbrook is right outside of Portland. Details on these Masses are below.

In addition, the St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy will be having Masses as usual every Sunday at 8:30AM (Basilica, Lewiston) and noon (side chapel, Cathedral, Portland), as mentioned on the sidebar, in addition to two Masses on each of the Holy Days (8 December, 25 December, 1 January).

So, here is the December schedule:

December 8th, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Noon: Low Mass at St. Anthony of Padua.

Noon: Sung Mass at the Basilica in Lewiston (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Christmas:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Noon: Sung Mass at the Basilica in Lewiston (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

BIG NEWS!!:

MIDNIGHT MASS 12AM St. Anthony of Padua

New Year’s Day:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Noon: Sung Mass at the Basilica in Lewiston (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

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Latin Masses in the Portland area in December, including a Midnight Mass!

As you know, this Sunday is the First Sunday of Advent, the beginning of a new Liturgical Year, and there are a plethora of Masses to be offered in the Extraordinary Form in the Portland area in December! (Around fifteen altogether, if you include the “regular” Sunday 8AM and noon Masses).

There are three Extraordinary Form Masses to be at St. Anthony of Padua, located in St. Hyacinth Church, 268 Brown Street, Westbrook, ME 04092 (207-857-0490 or E-mail to: stanthonyparish@myfairpoint.net) For those who (like me) may be unfamiliar, Westbrook is right outside of Portland. Details on these Masses are below.

In addition, the St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy will be having Masses as usual every Sunday at 8:30AM (Basilica, Lewiston) and noon (side chapel, Cathedral, Portland), as mentioned on the sidebar.

So, here is the December schedule:

This Saturday, December 1st, is First Saturday Mass (sung Mass) 9AM, with confessions at 8AM, St. Anthony of Padua.

Next Saturday, December 8th, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception there are two Masses:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

Noon: Low Mass at St. Anthony of Padua.

Christmas:

8AM: Low Mass at the Cathedral (St. Gregory the Great Latin Mass Chaplaincy).

BIG NEWS!!:

MIDNIGHT MASS 12AM St. Anthony of Padua

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